As part of the founding of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) has been restructured to enhance existing programs, create new opportunities, and increase connections to other parts of the Institute.

EECS, the largest academic unit at the Institute, is now jointly part of the MIT School of Engineering and the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing. It is composed of three overlapping academic units called “faculties”: electrical engineering (EE), computer science (CS), and artificial intelligence and decision making (AI+D). The department will remain responsible for Course 6.

“We expect the creation of these three more focused faculties within the department will facilitate curriculum development, faculty hiring, and collaborations across campus and across disciplines,” says Daniel Huttenlocher SM ’84, PhD ’88, dean of the college and the Henry Ellis Warren Professor of Computer Science and AI and Decision-Making. “The faculties will focus on faculty recruiting, mentoring, promotion, academic programs, and community building,” added Anantha P. Chandrakasan, dean of the School of Engineering and the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Joel Voldman SM ’97, PhD ’01, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science, has been tapped to lead the EE faculty. Arvind, the Jennifer C. Johnson Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, is heading CS. Antonio Torralba, the Thomas and Gerd Perkins Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is leading the AI+D faculty.

The three faculty leaders will contribute to the overall leadership of EECS under the direction of Asu Ozdaglar, School of Engineering Distinguished Professor of Engineering. As the newly appointed deputy dean of academics for the college, she also serves as the head of EECS. The three faculty leads and Ozdaglar will report jointly to Huttenlocher and Chandrakasan. The organizational plan for EECS was based on the final report of the Organizational Structure Working Group of the Computing Task Force.

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