Tish Scolnik. Photo: Len Rubenstein

Changing the World Through Service

Thousands of MIT students are participating in public service projects across the globe to gain leadership skills and to better serve the world.

Prof. Forest White hopes his work will lead to an effective new treatment for the most common type of adult brain tumor, glioblastoma - the kind that killed Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.  Photo: Richard Howard

Cancer Drugs

Prof. Forest White of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research is working to develop novel drug treatments.

Giving Back

Stephen '74 and Anne Cucchiaro of Boston make a major gift to MIT - the largest gift ever to the Sailing Pavilion.

Prof. Christine Ortiz's work may help engineers create the body armor of the future.  Photo: Richard Howard

Natural Armor

Prof. Christine Ortiz's work may help engineers create the body armor of the future.

Prof. Kripa Varanasi is designing tough new nanoengineered surfaces to be used in applications ranging from energy and electronics to water purification systems. (The screen behind him shows condensation of water on a superhydrophobic surface at very small length scales.)  Photo: Richard Howard

Tough New Surfaces

Prof. Kripa Varanasi is designing tough new nanoengineered surfaces to meet global energy and water demands.

Kuljot Anand says being a pilot has given him a great appreciation of the Earth's beauty and wholeness.  Photo: Richard Howard

Saving Energy

Freshman Kuljot Anand founded a green energy organization in Toronto and rounded up 250 volunteers to promote energy conservation across the city.

Spelling bee champion Anurag Kashyap now at MIT.  Photo: Richard Howard

Championship Spirit

Freshman Anurag Kashyap competed with 10 million children to win the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Now, he has won the Jeopardy Teen Tournament.

Tom Peterson stands before MIT's new cancer facility slated to open later this year. Photo: Richard Howard

‘Exciting Opportunity’

Tom Peterson '57 gives a major gift to MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, because he says that whatever MIT touches turns to gold.