The Chance to Soar

Students say a scholarship is the chance of a lifetime - a chance to learn, grow, and succeed.

David Thompson, ‘76, gave MIT a scholarship to honor his parents, who encouraged his love of spacecraft and rockets.
Photo: Bill Geiger

Saying Thanks

David Thompson, ‘76, gives MIT a scholarship to honor his parents.

Democracy and freedom are coming to business –– and it’s all because of technology, says Prof. Tom Malone of the Sloan School, who has written, The Future of Work, a new book that details how technology is changing the workplace –– including a time when employees will actually vote on who will be their boss.
Photo: Ed Quinn

Change at Work

Prof. Tom Malone says technology is changing the workplace – including a time when employees will actually vote on who will be their boss.

“I want to create efficient...technology to help the world,” says Assoc. Prof. Ted Selker, an inventor with 50 patents, whose vision for us all is to live in a world where we solve problems by using a minimum of the world’s resources.” Photo: Ed Quinn

Inventing the Future

Assoc. Prof. Ted Selker, who’s inventing technology for the future, dreams of a world that spins forever and doesn’t destroy its resources.

Assoc. Prof. Hiroshi Ishii, founder and director of the Tangible Media Group at MIT’s Media Lab, says Tangible Bits is like wearing a pair of eyeglasses to help us see the invisible. Photo: Ed Quinn

Tangible Technology

By making bits something we can manipulate with our hands and perceive through our senses, Assoc. Prof. Hiroshi Ishii is working to bridge the physical world with cyberspace.

Catherine Drennan, an associate professor of chemistry, is studying molecules that may one day yield major medical and environmental benefits. Photo: Ed Quinn

Enabling Life

Assoc. Prof. Catherine Drennan is studying molecules that may one day yield major medical and environmental benefits.

In the spirit of hands-on learning, Assoc. Prof. David Miller and his students have built mini-satellites. Miller’s professional life is steeped in space-related activities. Besides overseeing the mini-satellite project, he was co-leader of the group that devised the first hands-on experiments for the International Space Station. Inset photo: Students Alvar Saenz-Otero, Dustin Berkovitz, Dr. Edmund Kong, Prof. David Miller, and student Simon Nolet. Photo: Ed Quinn

Space Spheres

In the spirit of hands-on learning, Assoc. Prof. David Miller and his students are building mini-satellites.

Nathan Jones, 16 months, gets some help from his Dad at the Stata Center’s play area.
Photo: Ed Quinn

Child Play

Housed for the first time in an MIT academic building, children are exploring the world alongside scientists and engineers.

Saul Griffith has developed low-cost vision-testing and lens-manufacturing inventions that could dramatically improve life for billions of people in developing countries. The great irony, he says, is “I didn’t need eyeglasses when I started the project, but now I do.” Photo: Ed Quinn

New Invention

Saul Griffith developed a device to make low-cost eyeglasses that could benefit billions.

Photo: Ed Quinn

Bonny Bagpipes

Steve Reece has no Scottish blood, but he loves to play the bagpipes.